The Big Short: Banking, Greed and Margot Robbie

The Big Short (2015) is written and directed by Adam McKay based on the book by Micheal Lewis and stars Brad Pitt, Christian Bale, Steve Carell and Ryan Gosling. The film tells the true story of 4 groups who predicted the housing market crisis of the mid-2000s and how they take advantage of it.

Let’s get straight to it. I’ve been wanting to see this movie for a long time, and it didn’t disappoint. What made this film what it was is the cold and brutal way it poked fun at a very, very serious subject matter from recent memory. Caught somewhere between the seriousness of Wall Street (1987) and the outrageousness of The Wolf Of Wall Street (2013) comes The Big Short, a dark comedy stylised with gratuitous cameos and snappy meta wall-breakers. The film, still managed to pass on some uncomfortable social commentary that is sure to leave viewers very angry.

The Director of Anchorman (2004) brings us a 2 hour fast paced drama traversing a very complicated and detail orientated subject people don’t tend to find exciting. Banking, finance and real estate. The biggest hurdle this film had to overcome was to NOT be boring, whilst also not being overly simplified. The film succeeded in this regard from a combination of brilliant directing and acting.

Christian Bale and Steve Carell’s performances are amazing and really make you care about the characters in this predicament. Bale has a knack for playing socially isolated, strange individuals and so I could see him take on this role. But Carell’s performance really blew me away. A comedic veteran, turning in the most dramatic roles in the film. His bitter, angry and troubled portrayal was somewhat haunting and gives you a glimpse of the dark side of Wall Street. Brad Pitt was likeable in the few scenes he was in, and Ryan Gosling. Oh Ryan Gosling, was my favourite thing about this film. His smug and conceited Wall Street douchebag was a brilliant depiction of greed and arrogance one would expect from people in his position.

The film as I said earlier is quickly paced so much so that you have to really focus to pay attention between the shifting narrative of the 4 characters. This can be annoying at times, but I think it was done purposefully to avoid the film feeling like a slow grinding documentary about observing stocks and buying bonds.

a dark comedy stylised with gratuitous cameos and snappy meta wall-breakers. The film, still managed to pass on some uncomfortable social commentary that is sure to leave viewers very angry.

The cheeky way the film addresses how the corrupt greedy bankers manage to get away with ruining the economy is sure to turn faces red. It is a dark, yet poignant reminder that unfortunately in the real world – the rich screw over the poor.

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